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Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Red Cross Response Continued in Colorado Springs

By Bill Fortune

Update Thursday, September 1, 2016, Noon

Red Cross disaster caseworkers talk with residents
on Logan Ave in Colorado Springs. Photo by Arnett Luce,
Red Cross
The Red Cross support for people affected by the flash flood and hail that damaged property Monday, August 29th continues. Using the Colorado Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster (COVOAD) the Red Cross has rallied additional support.

A Red Cross disaster responder offers support to
residents on Logan Ave in Colorado Springs. Photo by
Arnett Luce, Red Cross
Beginning Friday, September 2, the Southern Baptist Disaster Relief Organization will be available to help people with clean up and recovery. Residents are urged to call 720-244-1601 for assistance. If people have already torn down sheet rock the Southern Baptist team can clean and spray the walls for mold remediation.

To date the Red Cross has opened 25 client cases and provided support to 43 adults and 18 children. The support includes direct client assistance (financial or temporary lodging), shovels, cleanup supplies, water, comfort kits (personal hygiene) and meals. Four additional cases are likely to be opened today depending on the disaster assessment process that is on going. People affected by the storm that have not contacted the Red Cross should call 719-785-2768.

Other organizations in the community have been approached to provide support. The downtown YMCA has offered shower facilities to those people affected by the flood without electricity (referral from Red Cross required).

---------------------------------------------------------

UPDATE AS OF 5:30 P.M.
As of 1730 30 August 2016, Red Cross has
- Assisted 14 family units consisting of 24 adults and 12 children
- Handed out 29 clean up kits
- 10 cases of water
We still have an additional 4 homes to visit that we know of.

------------------------------------------------

Basement apartment of home on Logan St. Water was
5 feet deep. Photo by Arnett Luce/American Red Cross
Colorado Springs, CO Tuesday, August 30, 2016, 4 p.m. - The American Red Cross of Southeastern Colorado continued to provide support for the people affected by the heavy rain, hail and flash flooding that occurred the afternoon of Monday, August 29, 2016.

Seven volunteers rallied Monday evening to provide immediate assistance to those affected. Five homes were considered unlivable, by Red Cross standards, with another 5 considered to have major damage.

Joe Smith shows the water line on the main
floor of a home on Logan st. The basement was
full of water and hail. Photo by Walt Palmer/
American Red Cross




The hardest hit area was in the area bounded by Hancock Ave to Bonfoy Ave and Platte to Pikes Peak. In that area it was identified that 3 apartments on Bonfoy Ave had major damage and by late afternoon five additional homes were assessed with Major Damage.

Medallion Retirement community was contacted about possible flooding. They indicated that though they had some flooding, it was under control so no service was provided.

By mid afternoon, our teams had opened 4 additional cases and provided financial assistance to 5 families for a total of 10 persons assisted thus far since the event began. We provided temporary lodging to one person due to complicated medical issues and at the request of his health care nurse.
Red Cross volunteers deliver much needed cleanup kits
to people on Logan St in Colorado Springs. Photo by
Walt Palmer/American Red Cross

Through the day Tuesday, Red Cross volunteers provided flood cleanup kits to anyone requesting them. Several people asked for tarps and shovels and those will be provided by the end of the day.

This blog will be updated after 7 p.m. when final data is available. 



Red Cross Providing Cleanup Supplies in Colorado Springs


Teams will be at Logan Ave and Platte Ave

By Bill Fortune

Colorado Springs, CO, Tuesday, August 30
Volunteer Rich Garcia loads cleanup kits for transport
to the hardest hit area of Colorado Springs. Photo by
Bill Fortune
2016— Heavy rain and hail produced flash flooding in the Colorado Springs area Monday evening. Streets and homes were flooded. Red Cross teams will be providing cleanup supplies from a staging area in a parking lot at the corner of Platte Ave and Logan Ave. The teams will also survey the neighborhoods to determine if additional assistance can be provided. The teams will be in place from 10:00 a.m. to mid-afternoon.

Red Cross disaster team went into the heavily affected area Monday evening to determine what help could be provided immediately to those affected. By the end of the evening it was determined that 6 homes were determined unlivable with an additional 5 homes determined to have suffered major damage. Red Cross opened 3 support cases for a total of 5 people, providing immediate non-livable assistance for 5 and temporary lodging for 4. Additional need will likely be discovered today as volunteers work with those hit hardest.

People affected by the flooding and hail who are in need of assistance can call the Red Cross client casework phone at 719-785-2768. Please leave a message and a caseworker will return the call.

Monday, August 29, 2016

Rain, Hail and Flooding Prompts Red Cross Response

By Bill Fortune

Hail piled up in the Colorado Springs area. Photo
by American Red Cross
Strong storms brought mountains of hail and buckets of rain to the Colorado Springs area. Roads were closed, homes flooded and streams threatened to overflow. Hail was 4 to 5 feet deep in some places and rainfall of more than 2 inches caused flash flooding that stranded motorists and forced water rescues.

Volunteers from the Red Cross of Southeastern Colorado were called out to help. Seven disaster responders trudged through the hail and deep water going door-to-door to find out who needed help. "We went to more than 60 homes between Prospect and Logan Streets," said Cori Tanner, Disaster Action Team Captain. "Some of these homes had 4 and 5 feet of hail in their basements."

The team was out in the elements for more than 4 hours and by the end of the evening they were cold and tired but happy they were able to help. They opened three client cases which provided support to five people. Many of those that they met with had already found a place to stay overnight and everyone knows the real work will start tomorrow.
Red Cross volunteers go door-to-door to find
out who needs help after devastating hail and floods.
Photo by American Red Cross

"We expect that we will get calls for help tomorrow," Tanner said. "When people see how much damage they received they will be reaching out to us for help."

If you, or someone you know, has suffered damage caused by the storms in the Colorado Springs area Monday evening, and you feel you need support from the Red Cross, please call our casework number 719-785-2768. Leave a message and a caseworker will call you back.

A Better Night's Sleep with a Special Smoke Alarm

Story and Photos by Walt Palmer, American Red Cross

Justin Israel sleeps on his left side, mostly, but frequently switches to his right side. It makes little difference in his life. His brother sleeps on his right side, because when he switches to his left side (which he frequently does when he is asleep) he enters a world of silence.
Justin has his new smoke alarm all set and
ready to go .

 Justin and his brother are both hearing impaired. Justin completely, his brother on his right side.


It's a big concern for their mother, Robyn Carr, because her two teen boys could not hear a regular smoke alarm if it went off at night while they slept. Just one of the many things that worries a mother and keeps her awake at night. Robyn's father was also deaf and she remembers that he had no technology to assist him with living his life. Now she has to worry about her sons. She really appreciates the technology available to those who need it today."I have tried for years to get an alarm that would work for them," She said. "I want to thank the Red Cross for making our lives safer." 

Robyn and Justin hold the new smoke alarm
at their home in Colorado Springs.
I met Robyn and Justin as part of a Red Cross team that was installing a special fire alarm in their apartment. The alarm, the "Lifetone HL", works by vibrating the bed to wake the occupant. At 17, Justin was all over the technology side of things. Installation is very straightforward and the alarm works with others already in the apartment. In a matter of minutes, Justin was testing it to make sure it was going to wake him in an emergency. He took a brief aside to actually set the built in alarm clock and put it next to his bed. Just one of the many things a teenager has to ignore each day. 


The Red Cross has documented hundreds of lives saved through our Home Fire Campaign. Our goal is to reduce home fire related deaths and injuries by 25 percent. We do that by installing smoke alarms in homes. The alarm and installation are absolutely free - just call your local Red Cross and ask about a smoke alarm.

For more information about the Home Fire Campaign and fire safety visit our web site at www.redcross.org/colorado/firesafety

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Red Cross Closes Shelter for Youth Hostel Evacuees

Denver, CO, August 24, 2016 1:00 P.M.— The American Red Cross has closed the shelter that was opened to support the evacuees from the International Youth Hostel in Denver. Residents have been referred to Denver Health and Human Services for additional support.



Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Red Cross Opens Shelter For Youth Hostel Evacuees

Denver, CO, August 23, 2016 8:30 P.M.— The American Red Cross in partnership with the Salvation Army has opened a shelter to house people evacuated from the International Youth Hostel in Denver. The shelter is located at the Salvation Army shelter located at 2915 N. High St., Denver, CO.

Red Cross shelter teams are working closely with partners from the Salvation Army, City of Denver and Denver Fire to make sure these young people have a place to stay tonight. This shelter is open for the International Youth Hostel evacuees only and is not open to the public.

Monday, August 22, 2016

A place to go when there is no place to go!


By Bill Fortune

Sandra's story from the Louisiana floods




It’s been a week after historic flooding in Louisiana devastated tens of thousands of lives, and the work of the Red Cross is just beginning. Red Cross workers are providing shelter, food and comfort right now, and will continue to be there in the weeks and months ahead, helping residents recover from this massive disaster.

· More than 1,700 Red Crossers – including some virtual workers helping online – from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are supporting Louisiana relief efforts. In addition, hundreds of local residents have volunteered.

Large disasters like this flooding create more needs than any one organization can meet, and the Red Cross is working closely with the entire response community – federal, state, county and local agencies, other non-profit organizations, churches, area businesses and others – to coordinate relief efforts and deliver help quickly and efficiently, keeping in mind the diverse needs of the community.

· Some of these partners include Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, the NAACP, Islamic Relief USA, Church of the Brethren Children’s Disaster Services, AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps, Verizon, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Americares, Jet Blue, Operation HOPE, Legal Services Corporation among others.

· The Red Cross will be working closely with partners in the days ahead to ensure people receive the help they need as quickly as possible.

The Red Cross urgently needs you to join us in supporting Louisiana by making a financial donation today.
· Help people affected by the Louisiana Floods by visiting redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS or texting the word LAFLOODS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.· Donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from these disasters.


Colorado and Wyoming Red Crossers Continue to Deploy

By Bill Fortune

Bringing Help and Hope is First Priority

Denver – August 22, 2016, Noon — The Red Cross has been responding to the call for help from people affected by the Louisiana Floods and the California Fires. 

Blue Cut Fire in California – The Blue Cut Fire forced the evacuation of 82,000 people and more than 230 people stayed at 7 Red Cross and community shelters near by. Two volunteers from Colorado have deployed to help with the Blue Cut Fire response near San Bernardino, CA. Eugene McGuire will support sheltering in California and Nina Page, a Red Cross Nurse, will provide minor medical support at a shelter. There are seven shelters open in the area with over 230 people residing. Both of these volunteers are from the Red Cross of the Mile High Area.
Louisiana Floods
The Red Cross called this disaster response, "the biggest disaster response since Hurricane Sandy" and the stories suggest that it is indeed that bad. It has been estimated that 40,000 homes have been inundated or affected by flood waters. More than 10,000 people have stayed in Red Cross shelters since the flooding began. Some of the people affected were also impacted by Hurricane Katrina nearly 11 years ago. To them this disaster is particularly disheartening.

One Family's Story
Tenisha Longmire and her three young children are safe in a Red Cross shelter in
Tenisha Longmire watches her 2 year old son at the
Red Cross shelter in Baton Rouge, LA.
Photo by Red Cross
Baton Rouge. But her journey to safety was frightening. After running to the store to stock up on supplies, Longmire couldn’t get home to her children because of the flooding. Her mother took the kids in, but Longmire couldn’t get to them. She slept in her car for several days until she reunited with her family. Then the family looked for a place to stay, but some places said they had no room. “I felt ashamed,” Longmire said. “But you folks…the Red Cross…you welcomed us….me…my kids. You folks have been so wonderful. I don’t know what we are going to do or where we are going to go, but I’ll never forget how kind your volunteers have been to us. You’ve treated us like family. Thank you, Red Cross.”

Volunteers Make It Happen
Jessica Clark, a Red Cross volunteer from Birmingham,
 Alabama, gives a flood clean-up kit and water
 to Cedric Batise during a relief supply distribution
 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Batise is a Red Cross 
volunteer whose home was flooded. Photo by
Red Cross
The Red Cross has deployed more than 1500 volunteers from around the country. Volunteers from Colorado and Wyoming have stepped up to join the massive humanitarian effort. They are giving time and energy to those in need. Since the flooding began we deployed 17 volunteers and 2 staff members to help in Louisiana. A typical deployment for a disaster response is 14 to 21 days. During those days the volunteers work 12 to 14 hour days helping people. Some help by delivering food or cleanup items. Some help at shelters making sure people are comfortable and that they have what they need. Others provide medical support to get additional medications, checking blood pressure or helping the elderly or people with special needs while others provide that very important emotional support. 

In addition we have seven volunteers who are supporting the disaster response virtually from home. These volunteers work shifts at home waiting for calls from people in Louisiana. They work directly with individuals whose homes have been impacted.
 That brings the total number of Colorado and Wyoming volunteers involved in the Louisiana response to 24 plus two staff members. 

FINDING LOVED ONES Residents of the affected areas can connect with their loved ones by using the “I’m Safe” button on the Red Cross Emergency App which is free and can be found in the app store for someone’s mobile device by searching for “American Red Cross” or by going to redcross.org/apps.

People can also visit www.redcross.org/safeandwell to register on the Red Cross Safe and Well website, a secure and private way that friends and family connect. The site also allows people to update their status on Facebook and Twitter.

BECOME A VOLUNTEER To become a Red Cross volunteer, visit redcross.org today to learn more about volunteer opportunities and how to submit a volunteer application.

HOW TO HELP People can donate by visiting redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS or texting the word LAFLOODS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recovery from these disasters.

Friday, August 19, 2016

Colorado and Wyoming Red Crossers Doing their Part to Help Louisianans

By Bill Fortune

Update at 5 P.M. Friday, August 19 - Four additional volunteers will be heading to help the people of Louisiana. That brings the total number of volunteers deployed to help in Louisiana from Colorado and Wyoming to 17 plus one staff member. The volunteers will depart to Baton Rouge on Saturday, August 20. Three of the volunteers will work in the shelters. The fourth volunteer will be working in Client Casework to help people with immediate need and recovery.

---------------------------------------------------------------

The Red Cross has been responding to the call for help from people affected by the Louisiana Floods. Earlier this week the Red Cross called this disaster, "the worst since Hurricane Sandy" and the stories suggest that it is indeed that bad. It has been estimated that 40,000 homes have been inundated or affected by flood waters. More than 10,000 people have stayed in Red Cross shelters since the flooding began. Some of the people affected were also impacted by Hurricane Katrina nearly 11 years ago. To them this disaster is particularly disheartening.

Map showing where Red Cross volunteers who have deployed
to Louisiana originated from. Courtesy American Red Cross
The situation remains dire and the Red Cross has called out volunteers from across the country to bring help and hope to the thousands of people affected. Volunteers from Colorado and Wyoming have stepped up to give time and energy to those in need. We have sent 12 volunteers and 1 staff member to support the people of Louisiana along with 2 of our Emergency Response Vehicles (ERV).

Four of our volunteers traveled on Thursday (8/18) in two ERVs. When they arrive in Baton Rouge they will be sent out to bring food, water and cleanup supplies to people affected by the floods. A Red Cross Nurse deployed earlier in the week along with 4 volunteers who will help in shelters. Another volunteer helping is to assess the damage to help with response decisions and another volunteer who will help coordinate with local, state and federal officials. A volunteer was sent to Dallas, TX to support the Digital Operations Center as they try to monitor and engage people affected by the floods. We also have one staff member positioned in our Disaster Operations Center helping to coordinate service delivery.
Doreen Ulm(L) talks with volunteer
Lynette Nyman. Photo American Red Cross
One resident escaping the flood waters in a Red Cross shelter in Gonzalez, LA, is 81-year-old Doreen Ulm, who survived air raids in London during World War II and because of the flood is at a shelter for the first time since the war.

Courtney Robinson, her husband and five children are almost sure their home is destroyed and are also taking refuge from the flooding in a Red Cross shelter. They fled their home with only some food and water and a change of clothes for the family. These are just two of the thousands of people impacted by this devastating flooding.
A Red Cross volunteer consoles Courtney Robinson at a
Red Cross shelter. Photo American Red Cross









Children hold hot meals they received from 
the Red Cross in Denham Springs, a town
 hit hard by flooding across southern Louisiana.




HOW TO HELP People can donate by visiting redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS or texting the word LAFLOODS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recovery from these disasters.

FINDING LOVED ONES Residents of the affected areas can connect with their loved ones by using the “I’m Safe” button on the Red Cross Emergency App which is free and can be found in the app store for someone’s mobile device by searching for “American Red Cross” or by going to redcross.org/apps.

People can also visit www.redcross.org/safeandwell to register on the Red Cross Safe and Well website, a secure and private way that friends and family connect. The site also allows people to update their status on Facebook and Twitter.

BECOME A VOLUNTEER To become a Red Cross volunteer, visit redcross.org today to learn more about volunteer opportunities and how to submit a volunteer application.

“It’s overwhelming,” says Mike Armstrong, who  is beginning to
 clean up following historic flooding across parts of southern Louisiana,
 including Denham Springs where Armstrong has lived for more than 30 years.
 Armstrong welcomed iced water and hot meals from Red Cross
 volunteer Cora Lee, a local relief worker.
To get the latest news from the Red Cross go to our website: redcross.org



Monday, August 15, 2016

Colorado Volunteers will bring help and hope to Louisiana


Update: 3 p.m., Wednesday, August 17, 2016
Colorado and Wyoming Region support for the Louisiana Flood response continues to grow. On Thursday, August 18, 2016 two additional volunteers will depart to bring help and hope to the people of Louisiana whose lives have been devastated by this event.

Charlotte Hardy, a volunteer from Powell, WY, will travel to Baton Rouge, LA to serve as a supervisor at one of the Red Cross shelters. As such she will ensure that the needs of the people are being met and helping start them on the road to recovery.


Lezah Saunders, a volunteer from Ouray, CO, will travel to Baton Rouge, LA to serve as a Government Liaison. She will work closely with local, state and federal governments to identify the needs of those affected and coordinate the appropriate response.

Courtney Robinson (center) says she is nearly certain that
her home is destroyed because of the record flooding
 in southern Louisiana. She’s staying at a Red Cross
 shelter with her children and husband, Jeff Harper.
Photo credit Red Cross
These volunteers are part of more than 1000 volunteers who have rallied to help the people of Louisiana.  On Tuesday night, more than 7,000 people were still seeking refuge in more than 34 Red Cross and community shelters in Louisiana. The Red Cross and partners have served nearly 100,000 meals and snacks since the onset of the flooding.

The Red Cross has also mobilized more than 60 disaster response vehicles, nearly 40,000 ready-to-eat meals, and more than two dozen trailer loads of shelter and kitchen supplies to bolster relief efforts. Some of the supplies arriving include water, personal hygiene items, insect repellent, cleaning kits, bleach and other important supplies.

The Red Cross urgently needs the public to join us in supporting Louisiana by making a financial donation today. You can help people affected by the Louisiana Floods by giving a donation on our web site, redcross.org, by calling 1-800-RED CROSS or texting the word LAFLOODS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recovery from these disasters.


Update: 2 p.m., Tuesday, August 16,2016
Additional volunteers are heading to Louisiana
The Red Cross is working to support the needs of the people affected by the floods in Louisiana. By the end of this week there will be over 800 Red Cross volunteers in place to shelter, feed and comfort those people forced to leave their homes.

Two additional volunteers from Colorado will travel to Baton Rouge on Wednesday.

Ned Daly, from Littleton, CO who volunteers with the Mile High Area, will travel to Baton Rouge, LA to help supervise aspects of the supply distribution process. His work will be vital as the growing need for cleanup supplies and other items expands.

Maureen Kelly, from Centennial, CO, also volunteers with the Mile High Area. She will travel to Baton Rouge, LA on Wednesday to support the disaster assessment process. As the flood waters recede, trained Red Cross teams will go out an look at each home to determine the level of destruction. That information is fed back to the response headquarters to help with determining what additional resources will be needed to help the people affected.

Update:11 a.m. Tuesday, August 16, 2016
Red Cross volunteers unload supplies at the warehouse
in Baton Rouge. Photo credit Red Cross
Support from Colorado and Wyoming continues to materialize as staff, volunteers and equipment are being staged to deploy. Deployment numbers issued yesterday have changed.

At this time the following individuals are either scheduled to deploy or have already deployed.

Spencer Pollack - Executive Director for Wyoming Chapter has deployed to Red Cross Disaster Operations Center in Washington D.C. He will serve as a liaison to the disaster operations team in Louisiana providing situational awareness for National headquarters.

Volunteer Catherine Leventhall monitors social media
at the Digital Ops Center in Dallas. Photo credit
Red Cross
Catherine Leventhal - Colorado Public Affairs volunteer from the Denver area has deployed to the Digital Operations Center in Dallas, TX. Her role is to monitor social media to maintain awareness of social media conversations that might impact the disaster response.

Luba Epshtein - a volunteer Red Cross nurse from Aurora, CO with the Mile High Area deployed to Baton Rouge, LA to support health services needs of those people affected by the floods.

Two Emergency Response Vehicles (ERV) will deploy to Louisiana on Thursday. Their departure will be at 9 a.m. with arrival at Baton Rouge sometime on Saturday. The following volunteers will travel with the ERVs to help with the delivery of food and other supplies to those affected by the floods..

An ERV in Baton Rouge waits to take on supplies. Photo
credit Red Cross
Arden Anderson - volunteer from Gunnison, CO with the Red Cross of Western Colorado.
Kevin Erikson - from Centennial, CO volunteers with the Mile High Area.
Suzanne Faerber - from Conifer, CO volunteers with the Mile High Area.
Rose Knight - from Colorado Springs volunteers with the Red Cross of Southeastern Colorado.
_____________________________________________________
Update:2 p.m. Monday, August 15, 2016
The American Red Cross has mounted a massive response to help the people of Louisiana recover from the record rainfall and flooding. More than 500 Red Cross volunteers are on the way from across the country along with over 60 Emergency Response Vehicles (ERV). "This will be one of the biggest responses since our response to Hurricane Sandy," said Gino Greco, CEO for the Colorado and Wyoming Region.

The Red Cross has opened 50 shelters in an effort to house more than 10,000 people who have had to leave their homes.

Red Cross volunteers and staff will be heading to Louisiana this week. The first to go will be drivers for the Emergency Response Vehicles from Grand Junction and Fort Collins. Each ERV is deployed with a team of two and they will be leaving from Denver Wednesday morning. The ERV teams will deliver food and water to shelters and when it is safe they will deliver cleanup supplies to individual homes.

Colorado Volunteers will drive an ERV similar to
the one in the photo to help the people of Louisiana.
Photo credit:American Red Cross
Suzanne Faerber is one of the team members who will be taking the ERV to Louisiana. She has been a volunteer for three years and recently deployed to help people affected by floods in south Texas. "I really sympathize with the people in Louisiana. The suffering I saw in Texas made me realize how important the Red Cross is when there is a large disaster," she said. "I am glad I can go there and help them." A typical Red Cross deployment is for 14 to 21 days.

Also deploying to Baton Rouge, LA are volunteers Arden Anderson from Gunnison and Kevin Erickson from Denver. Colorado volunteers will also provide remote support via phone for individual client casework. The volunteers are titled Virtual Call Agents and will work from home to help people in Louisiana connect with Red Cross services. Volunteer Paul Lucas has been designated as a Virtual Call Agent.

How can you help?

We are in the early stages of the response and our goal is to try and meet the immediate needs of those affected by providing food, water and shelter.

You can help the Red Cross help the people of Louisiana by donating to Red Cross Disaster Relief. A special designation has been identified that will direct fund directly to the response. You can go to www.redcross.org/donate and then select LAFloods as a designation. You can call 1-800-RedCross and select Donate. Make sure you ask to designate the donation to the LAFloods. To make a $10 donation you can text the words LAFLOODS to 90999. The donation will show on your cellular provider bill.


Colorado Volunteers will bring help and hope to Louisiana

The American Red Cross has mounted a massive response to help the people of Louisiana recover from the record rainfall and flooding. More than 500 Red Cross volunteers are on the way from across the country along with over 60 Emergency Response Vehicles (ERV). "This will be one of the biggest responses since our response to Hurricane Sandy," said Gino Greco, CEO for the Colorado and Wyoming Region.

The Red Cross has opened 50 shelters in an effort to house more than 10,000 people who have had to leave their homes.

Red Cross volunteers and staff will be heading to Louisiana this week. The first to go will be drivers for the Emergency Response Vehicles from Grand Junction and Fort Collins. Each ERV is deployed with a team of two and they will be leaving from Denver Wednesday morning. The ERV teams will deliver food and water to shelters and when it is safe they will deliver cleanup supplies to individual homes.

Colorado Volunteers will drive an ERV similar to
the one in the photo to help the people of Louisiana.
Photo credit:American Red Cross
Suzanne Faerber is one of the team members who will be taking the ERV to Louisiana. She has been a volunteer for three years and recently deployed to help people affected by floods in south Texas. "I really sympathize with the people in Louisiana. The suffering I saw in Texas made me realize how important the Red Cross is when there is a large disaster," she said. "I am glad I can go there and help them." A typical Red Cross deployment is for 14 to 21 days.

Also deploying to Baton Rouge, LA are volunteers Arden Anderson from Gunnison and Kevin Erickson from Denver. Colorado volunteers will also provide remote support via phone for individual client casework. The volunteers are titled Virtual Call Agents and will work from home to help people in Louisiana connect with Red Cross services. Volunteer Paul Lucas has been designated as a Virtual Call Agent.

How can you help?

We are in the early stages of the response and our goal is to try and meet the immediate needs of those affected by providing food, water and shelter.

You can help the Red Cross help the people of Louisiana by donating to Red Cross Disaster Relief. A special designation has been identified that will direct fund directly to the response. You can go to www.redcross.org/donate and then select LAFloods as a designation. You can call 1-800-RedCross and select Donate. Make sure you ask to designate the donation to the LAFloods. To make a $10 donation you can text the words LAFLOODS to 90999. The donation will show on your cellular provider bill.


Thursday, August 11, 2016

Red Cross Job Opportunities in Colorado and Wyoming

Updated August 29, 2016

Are you looking for a career with the American Red Cross? We have tons of openings across the country in a wide variety of positions. Go to our Red Cross Career site and search for jobs across the country.

Looking for a job in Colorado and Wyoming? Check out these openings:

*NEW* Disaster Program Specialist
Denver, CO | RC 2880

We are currently seeking a Disaster Program Specialist to work in our Denver, CO office. This position will work 8:30am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday, and some weekends and evenings will be required during times of business need. Travel will also be involved up to 20% of the time.

The Disaster Program Specialist is responsible for the implementation of the disaster services program in an assigned geographic territory.  The territory is based on the regional configuration.  Leads and manages a primarily volunteer team responsible for the implementation of disaster preparedness, response, and recovery programs in the local area.

 Event Coordinator (Lead Specialist)
Denver, CO | RC1083
Cheyenne, WY | RC1672


Check out these videos to learn more about the American Red Cross:




Red Cross Helps West Virginia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuh90leIoFo 



Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Why is the Clock Tower Glowing Red?

Denver, CO, Tuesday, August 2, 2016, - The American Red Cross is hosting a networking opportunity for invited guests at The Daniels & Fisher Clock Tower in Denver from 5:30 to 7:30 P.M., Wednesday, August 3, 2016. The event is themed, “What makes the Red Cross Tick”, and is designed to educate those invited guests about what the Red Cross does and how they can be better involved in the humanitarian mission.

In support of this activity the D&F Clock Tower will be “turned red” tonight and Wednesday night. We hope that people, even those not attending the event, who see the Tower lit up in red will take a moment to think about the Red Cross and its humanitarian mission and the support that the Red Cross brings to Colorado and Wyoming every day.

What makes the Red Cross tick is the daily need in our community for individuals to perform lifesaving skills such as CPR/First Aid, to help people recover from a home fire, to support people affected by a large wildfire or other disaster, or to provide support for our Armed Forces, their families and veterans. Ninety percent of the disaster force within the Red Cross is volunteer so finding people willing to give of their time is crucial to the success of our mission.  The Red Cross has been helping people in Colorado and Wyoming for more than 100 years.

Please note that this is not a public event and designed for invited guests only.